Improving Throughput, Mythbusting

More No-Value Care: pre-procedure INR for cirrhotics

You have a cirrhotic patient in front of you. They need a procedure. You reflexively order a cbc, comprehensive metabolic panel, and PT/INR because you’d like to know about their platelets/ liver enzymes / coagulation ability.

Or maybe it’s a consultant who refuses to do a procedure the patient needs until you order these tests.

And then the platelets come back at 40; or maybe the INR returns at 1.4. Now what?

Do we need to transfuse platelets or FFP? Well, this case series looked at 852 consecutive cirrhotics from Jan ’11 – March ’14 who needed an invasive procedure the decision to transfuse PLT / FFP at attending discretion. Here’s a breakdown of their patient demographics:

screen-shot-2017-02-18-at-7-47-52-pm

And the number of complications:

screen-shot-2017-02-18-at-7-48-04-pm

Now, sadly, despite discussing the World Health Organization classification for bleeding events, they did not really get into the severity of bleeding events. With that said, complications were unrelated to platelet count, INR, CHILD classes, and MELD score. Only 1 in 379 paracentesis had a bleeding event, and only 2 of 228 TIPS/ CVC/ PICC/ hemodialysis/ I&D procedures had an event.

Perhaps most importantly, while attempts to normalized PLT and INR values, PLT/FFP transfusions barely affected the corresponding abnormalities, the scheduled invasive investigations were carried out in the presence of still subnormal parameters- with no or only a few bleeding complications.

Ergo, I agree with the authors, – “we have verified clinically the futility of this recommendation.”

Standard

One thought on “More No-Value Care: pre-procedure INR for cirrhotics

  1. Interesting thoughts, but INR was >1,3, PLT 1,3 and PLT of 5 is also < 50, and these values are a total different league. The problem is, I think, if there is a semielective situation and you don't have these values and the patient bleeds and dies, then you get yourself a nice lawsuit. It has to happen once. There is a patient to patient decision, because if I just have to place an arterial catheter in the radial artery which is very good to palpate or a catheter in the femural vein, I can live with not knowing those values.
    Thanks for sharing !

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